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Sandy

[race_prep] Our Hillclimb/sprint 205

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kyepan

Could the pulleys be re-anodised? and what state is the engine build, would love to see some more pics and information about that too, within reason.

 

Cheers

J

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scollay

hmmmmmm,i recognise those pulleys from somewhere!?;) they were pretty bad looking at the pics,and to think i had them running on my own engine?!?you can buy DIY anodising kits if you would be interested in weather proofing them again?looking good now though!

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Mad Scientist

Nice work fellas! Looking forward to poking around this when I come down.

 

Any more info on the engine spec?

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Sandy

We could get them re-anodised or paint them, but the important wear part is still anodised and not bothered about the rest.

 

I'm not awfully keen about showing the engine internally in detail, because there are a number of things I've done "differently" that will be obvious in photos. The outline spec is:

Iron block (legal type, no debates please!)

85mm bore custom CP pistons

88mm TD crank

Custom Robson rods to my design with Carrillo bolts

Ultra light small diameter flywheel with 5.5" race clutch

Dry sump system, one off by us

Water pump driven by aux belt

TU cambelt and rollers

XU7J4 head heavily re-worked by me

Single piece stainless valves

Piper double valve springs

Solid followers

Custom cam profiles ground for me by Piper

Those pulleys

4x single throttle bodies on custom inlet, with custom trumpet profile

2x per cylinder GSXR1000 injectors

Custom exhaust manifold to my design

DTA S40 ECU on custom loom

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Mad Scientist

Some interesting things in that list. Sounds like it has the makings of a monster.

 

The GSXR injectors are finally getting a use then! I've got some here, but I doubt you need any more spares! Can you comment on flow rates or spray patterns?

 

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Sandy

Yes, I've had some really good results with them, in couple cases showing a markedly better performance than equivalent Bosch ones. The flow rates vary (mostly around 260-280cc) and no data on the spray pattern, but I just try them and see if they work.

Target is to get a strong, wide delivery (down to about 3000rpm) that enables gearchanges to be avoided in complex sections and "up one" gears to be used on wet tracks, for good traction. I'm using a new direction on the cam profiles, which I hope will work, but we'll see!

 

Here's a 1600 of mine (cal/corrected engine dyno figures) on GSXR and Bosch 360cc single injectors, no other changes apart from trimming the map suit each, incredible difference the injectors made:

Jul1208.jpg

Edited by Sandy
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wardy18

Great work Sandy.....

 

I really hope your still building engines in a few years when i want that 1.8 16v building..............!?! :P Maybe i should book you in now :D

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Sandy

Hopefully, but i'm definitely scaling back my engine building! It's a while since I did the last 1800 16v and I'd like to see what I can do applying what I've learnt since.

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Mad Scientist

Interesting comparison above. Presumably, if the flow rates were the same, this is all down to patterns and atomisation. I guess bike injectors are optimised for high duty cycles at very high rpm?

 

However, one thing that I don't get is where on earth you would get a standard gsxr 360cc injector? That would seem big even for the hyabusa engine since they all run 8 injectors don't they?

 

 

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Mad Scientist

Google is hinting at S2000 injectors???

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Sandy

The flow rates aren't the same, don't quote it as equivalent, it's just one example that I can talk about. I'm not going to go into this subject in great detail and hand over a huge amount of engine dyno testing data for free I'm afraid. Suffice to illustrate what a different injector choice can make. On another engine the situation could be quite different. Another point on this subject, the fuel map does not simply increase/decrease wholesale with an injector change, the shape of the entire map changes; you can't simply correct the whole lot by percentage.

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Mad Scientist

It certainly illustrates how attention to small details can make big differences.

 

 

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harryskid

Great stuff, wish i could afford a build like this :)

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EdCherry

Busa's run 4 injectors.

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welshpug

how's progress? :)

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Sandy

Car's nearly done and all being well we'll have the engine on the dyno later today, to run tomorrow.

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wardy18

How did the dyno session turn out Sandy?

 

Were all dying to know the results... :D

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Batfink

please can we have more inspirational pictures :D

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Mad Scientist

Sandys internet isn't working, so you will all have to wait!! :)

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chipstick

Saw this engine on the dyno yesterday. Outstanding.

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Bas

Saw this engine on the dyno yesterday. Outstanding.

 

And you forgot your camera...

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TT205

Saw this engine on the dyno yesterday. Outstanding.

 

Come on then 'half' spill the beans!

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Sandy

Things have moved on a long way since my last post. The car is almost ready, but the most notable epic has been the closing stages of the engine build. A week's holiday at the start of the month set me back a long way and couple seemingly straight forward jobs after that, took up alot more time than expected; so the back end of last week meant a hard weekend finishing the build. A couple dry builds helped to dial out most of the usual assembly complications, despite the number of these I've built now, the small changes I make on the quest for improvements, always have a domino effect and the number of custom parts mean that it's not like putting Lego together! Youtube videos of Americans assembling Honda or V8 engines from a range of standardised parts or keen amateurs slapping together off the shelf bits without making the proper checks on a garage work bench, can give a distorted view of how long it takes to properly prepare and assemble a race engine such as this!

 

With most of the legwork done, it did fairly well slot together, but there was some last minute faffing with valve spring installs, cam clearance in the head and the thick end of a day to surface grind the tappet shims to a fine tolerance. Depsite raiding JRE's shim supply as usual, there weren't any thick enough to suit the follower tip and exhaust side gap, so we had to make some. Not as easy as it might appear on the face of it! With that done, there was a period of calm, the ring gaps were spot on out of the bag (almost always the case with the pistons I use thankfully) and the squish clearance (piston to head gap at the edge), was 0.1mm thicker than I'd aimed for, an acceptable margin. After extensive chamber work, the head needed to be skimmed slightly more than I'd planned and the valve-piston clearance was hence reduced to the lowest possible value really, I'd have liked a bit more room to try cam swing, but it was more important to finish it by this stage.

Colin came down to mine for the final stages and we loaded it into his car to finish at his early on Monday morning before fitting to the engine dyno. A few pics along the way...

 

Carrillo bolt (larger head) vs the regular ARP2000. Alot of extra money, but much increased reliability in longer stroke engines:

Aug12blog01.jpg

 

5.5" clutch plat and small diameter flywheel:

Aug12blog02.jpg

 

Engine ready to lift onto the dyno stand:

Aug12blog03.jpg

 

Once at the dyno, we went at it hammer and tongs to get it ready to run that afternoon. Using an engine dyno tends to be about 70% getting it ready and 30% running time! But by 3pm we were about ready to go.

 

Colin making finishing touches, through the control room window:

Aug12blog04.jpg

 

I summoned John (John Read, JRE racing engines), who I do most of my dyno work with. We do about 60 engines a year together and although I could cope with it on my own, I much prefer to have him driving it and watching the gauges while I work the ECU. Having one of the best 4 cylinder engine builders in the country there for a second opinion can be invaluable too, as time would prove.

It started well on the base map and we were seeing about 50psi oil pressure as it was running in, dropping to about 38psi warm. Pretty low for one of the these, but you always have to adjust the dry sump pump anyway, so we weren't worried. After about half an hour running, John went into the cell to adjust the pump live and screwing in the adjuster did nothing to improve it... uh oh!

We went all round the houses checking the external oil system, pulled out the pump valve to check it worked ok, tried another springs, all sorts and by about 5.30pm, the noise curfew was looming and we didn't have a solution, so knocked it on the head for the day, with oil now all over the place in the rush and me with my head in my hands. John and Colin are exceptionally calm and sensible people in these situations compared to me, but Colin was starting to look a bit frustrated too. We stripped the pump over at JRE and couldn't see an issue, so retired to BK for some fast food therapy.

 

Tuesday morning and I was confronted with several messages and missed calls from various customers keen to know how their own work was progressing, perfectly reasonable, but frustrating when I'm stuck on something else! John had a C20XE to go on the dyno, so Colin and I made the decision at about 8.30am to pull our engine off the dyno to investigate internally.

We tipped the engine over and initial inspection showed nothing, bearing clearances got re-checked and were all perfect; I took some time away to map the XE for John and while that cooled down, he suggested running the oil pump with the sump off to try and see where the volume of oil was being lost. I anticipated more oily mess, but it instantly revealed a huge volume flowing through the piston oil jets. This is a Diesel block and the oil jets were quite blatantly flowing alot more than the petrol block ones do! Colin set about blocking the jets (I don't normally use them anyway in XU10 blocks) and I helped John get the XE off. Jets back in and we whizzed the oil pump on the cordless... WHOOSH! Oil pressure off the scale! T.F.F.T!

 

Back on the dyno again by about 3 pm and John wasn't able to come back in time, so I gave Colin a crash course in driving the engine on the dyno and we rather nervously finished the running in period and started to work through the higher load areas of the maps. About 4500rpm wasn't as good as my last one (the 174lbft that one pulled there was unusually epic!), and it didn't sound that aggressive up to about 5000rpm, but past 5000 it really got an edge to the induction bark and was easily pulling 180lbft+ by 6000, where we decided to wait for John.

John and I rattled through the mapping beyond in the same rhythm that makes his XEs so easy for us and by the 6 pm curfew, we had a fair idea how the land lied, peak values so far being 186.6lbft at 6500rpm and 268bhp at 8000rpm, although by the way the figures were climbing, we weren't sure if a trumpet change might benefit 4-8k rpm, the area we most wanted the engine to work in, but never the less... looking good :)

 

Aug12blog05.jpg

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kyepan

nice to hear you found the issue! look forward to some kind of video to hear it's first words.

Edited by kyepan

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Sandy

Forgot to mention, Tuesday finish had a much more positive feel, so Colin and I retired to my favourite take away food emporium (and my employer 1995-1996!) Cap'n Jaspers, well known to Plymouth Barbican regulars! Colin's first Jasperizer!

 

Wednesday morning I was on another job, but I had spacers and more trumpets at the ready. That job was looking good by mid afternoon, so I checked the cam timing, to find it needed a tweak of about 10 thou on the inlet, but very much on the limit for clearance! When we ran it up, we checked it over to base line the current set up (Colin and my special profile machined trumpets that I've developed to suit my engines) and took a straight set of figures. Very pleased to see the cam timing and further mapping had peaked torque at 191lbft at 6500rpm (that's genuine calibrated and DIN corrected 95.6lbft/litre from 1997cc), very much on target and 272bhp at 8000rpm. I had no desire to test it steady state beyond 8k at this time!

First of we switched from our machined profile trumpets, to spun/rolled Jenvey trumpets of the same length, with a tapered shape to suit the bodies. Although it showed a 7lbft improvement at 5500rpm, it was notably worse everywhere else and peak power was down to 256bhp at 8k. This wouldn't necessarily be the case on all engines, but it was on the one that mattered!

 

We tried different spacers with our trumpets, but it was clear my initial estimate set up produced the best curve from 4-8k rpm and with the curfew looming again, I decided to call it a day. John was keen to push on past 8k to see what it would do, but I'd hit my targets and had a crisp, friendly, grunty engine, all in one piece and Colin on the phone wanting to collect it!

 

Final figures 191lbft at 6500rpm, 272bhp at 8000rpm, (steady state recorded, calibrated and DIN corrected, ambient conditions AT 30-35C, 1010mb, 55% RH), not tested beyond 8k:

 

Satch1997cc.jpg

 

Thanks to Colin most of all, but also huge gratitude to John Read (JRE), also to Pete Willis, Mark Shillaber, Piper Cams, Robson, CP-Carrillo, Matt Osbourne at Mill Auto Supplies and Hawkins Peugeot!

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