Jump to content

Welcome to the brand new 205GTIDrivers.com website! We hope you'll enjoy it! Read the full notice here.

  • Welcome to 205GTIDrivers.com!

    Hello dear visitor! Feel free to browse but we invite you to register completely free of charge in order to enjoy the full functionality of the website.

jamie_1992

Running in an engine

Recommended Posts

jamie_1992

Looking for a bit of advice on running in a newly rebuilt engine before taking it for mapping,

how long should it be run bearing in mind I’ve been advised not to drive it until it’s been mapped 

i was advised to use some cheaper oil for the first 100 miles to help bed in then change for a better oil, dose this sound right? 

Any other advise I might need would be appreciated 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
petert

Straight mineral high zinc oil say 10W-40. (or zinc additive)

2000 mins for 10mins to run the cams in, NO idling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jamie_1992

Do the pistons need bedding in before I take it mapping 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

I take it that its non standard ignition? If so I'd be inclined to stick the stock ignition on it if possible and run it in on the road before mapping. Would just save you some mapping time (read cash) not having to do it then. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jamie_1992
30 minutes ago, Kane said:

I take it that its non standard ignition? If so I'd be inclined to stick the stock ignition on it if possible and run it in on the road before mapping. Would just save you some mapping time (read cash) not having to do it then. 

I’d have thought running a high compression engine on standard ecu would be just as bad as runnning an unmapped aftermarket ecu? but I may be wrong 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Miles

Millers Oils CRO 10w-40 Competition Running In Mineral Engine or Joe Gibb's but it's allot more expensive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Apologies, your first post didn't mention any detail about the engine spec which is why I'd suggested using the standard ignition. Would be worth putting up a little more detail.

 

Have you spoken to your mapper to see what they are expecting? They might be happy enough to run it up on the dyno as part of the mapping session.  Alternatively you could see if anyone on here has a map for a similar spec engine to use to run it in.

 

If you can get the car run in before your mapping session it would be beneficial as it will allow you to catch any unexpected faults. Last thing you want is to have the mapping delayed/called off on the day. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jamie_1992
14 minutes ago, Miles said:

Millers Oils CRO 10w-40 Competition Running In Mineral Engine or Joe Gibb's but it's allot more expensive

Thanks miles 

any recommendation on how long you should run with the break in oil and what brand oil you should swap it out for? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jamie_1992
6 minutes ago, Kane said:

Apologies, your first post didn't mention any detail about the engine spec which is why I'd suggested using the standard ignition. Would be worth putting up a little more detail.

 

Have you spoken to your mapper to see what they are expecting? They might be happy enough to run it up on the dyno as part of the mapping session.  Alternatively you could see if anyone on here has a map for a similar spec engine to use to run it in.

 

If you can get the car run in before your mapping session it would be beneficial as it will allow you to catch any unexpected faults. Last thing you want is to have the mapping delayed/called off on the day. 

Mapping is going to be done by sandy brown, il message him later and ask 

I’m using a dta s40 ecu with and 8 injector set up, hi comp pistons, Newman ph4 cams.

i understand what your saying about getting it run in as much as possible before making the 500 mile round trip for mapping, wouldn’t want to get there and not be able to get it done 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Sandy should be able to advise the best method. He'll probably be able to provide you with a map to get a few miles on it before taking it all the way down to him too, if that's what he suggests. 

 

As for running in the procedure I took, after reading various info online, was mineral oil for the first 50 or so miles varying load up to about 3k rpm. Drain, change filter and replace with more mineral oil and repeat process but also marginally increasing rpm as you tot up miles. Repeat this step at 500 miles then again at about the 1000-1500 miles but at that point put in a semi-synthetic oil of your choice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
allanallen

Once the cams (as peter mentioned) and the rings are bed in (after a few miles) I really don’t understand what else needs running in for mile upon mile??

 

My mi16 was run In on the rollers, 30 minutes of moderate load acceleration and deceleration to bed the rings in, changed the oil and off we went. 

My two gti6s were ran in similarily on the road, all  have proven to be good strong engines with excellent compression etc. 

 

I’m really not sure what a 1500 mile running in period is achieving? Plus for people with race cars this is unachievable, you’ve no chance of racking up that sort of mileage on something that’s not road legal. 

 

Are you advised with new cars to run them in over long periods of time with frequent oil changes? I never have or will buy a new car but I’m guessing this isn’t the case and I’m sure the engines  don’t spend hours on a dyno before being fitted to the cars. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
blandy

Great thread was about to ask a similar question allthough mine has no ability for road miles so will be a case of running in cams/rings and then off to map 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
petert

To bed the rings in, find a long hill (or dyno), 4th gear 2500rpm and bury your foot for 5 secs of so. This will push the rings out against the bore. Repeat half a dozen times, then race.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wicked
On 13-3-2018 at 12:13 AM, Kane said:

Sandy should be able to advise the best method. He'll probably be able to provide you with a map to get a few miles on it before taking it all the way down to him too, if that's what he suggests. 

 

As for running in the procedure I took, after reading various info online, was mineral oil for the first 50 or so miles varying load up to about 3k rpm. Drain, change filter and replace with more mineral oil and repeat process but also marginally increasing rpm as you tot up miles. Repeat this step at 500 miles then again at about the 1000-1500 miles but at that point put in a semi-synthetic oil of your choice. 

 

Think you are right on the oil; start with low spec oil and change pretty quickly.

But don't be gentle on the new engine for so long. As others state; only the first miles you need to build up the load to bed the rings etc. If that is done, just floor it.  I think the dyno is your best chance to do that properly.

I would only fire up the engine (and run at high idle) to see if there are no leaks etc. Then stop and put it on the dyno.  Don't let it idle for to long; you will waste the time window where you can bed in the rings properly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy

Late to this party, but not been on here for a bit. In my opinion, getting the engine to run cleanly as soon as possible is way more important than protracted light load mileage. Running on inaccurate map settings can cause bore wash and/or piston damage before you've got anywhere; it's not uncommon for "run in" engine to come to me for mapping smoking and fouling plugs, then it takes a long time for the engine to clean up, which may mean the engine improves beyond the mapping session and will need a second session.

I prioritise light to medium load/speed mapping, which is what takes most of the time and is an effective way to run an engine in harmlessly, done sympathetically. Once it feels right and breathing subsides, you know it's ready for higher speed and load, to move on to WOT mapping.

Base maps are another element of this, I don't supply base maps any more, partly because half of them never turn up to be mapped (you know who you are, ****s!) and partly because even on a pretty well established spec, the basic throttle position, balance, MAP values, lead angle etc need to be set up before the map can work evenly vaguely accurately, in the areas it spends most of it's time.

Best bet is, get it ready to go and get it to a knowledgeable and sympathetic tuner/engine builder ASAP.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
welshpug

Sandy beat me to it with far more detail!

 

Just get it as sorted as you can and strap it to the rollers, I managed to get mine running and did the cam bedding in and coolant bleeding myself, then took it to Sandy.

 

Is it still 1998cc or larger?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
blandy

My engine is sat in the garage currently - is newly built with new pistons rods and 87mm bore. Cams are not in currently as will get fitted and timed by someone with more experience than me but head is bolted down. 

 

Been sitting for for a few weeks now due to one reason or another is it worth turning over by hand every now and again or just leaving alone? Thinking of the new rings but also lack of oil etc - I know In a ideal world would of been built up and then installed but had a few unexpected things to deal with aside from the car which has put me back prob best part of 8 weeks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Telf

mines sat built with no car to go in..Ive added mineral oil to the Cam which has made its way everywhere - ive just been turning it on the fly wheel to keep it moving until the cars ready. Dunno if that's right!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy

If the engine is being stored, it's best to be somewhere with minimal temperature changes or condensation will attack it; if your airing cupboard is big enough...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
blandy

Hmmm difficult one then-

what would you suggest

 

leave as it is and turn over now and again.

 

removing the head so I can oil the bores and then turn over weekly until got the time/extra parts to complete? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×