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welshpug

it really doesn't matter if the engine is original or not, if it looks like an 8v xu, it is..

 

they all pin at mid stroke on the crank pulley, the 8v as you can see has a solid metal pulley so cannot be wrong, only if the woodruff key in the nose of the crank is missing.

 

the AFM can be adjusted but you really should leave the cover securely glued on and use the provided bypass screw.

 

given it ran fine beforehand, and that the AFM shouldn't need to be removed to change the timing belt it 'should' be fine, however if the garage had been messing with it...

 

 

check the belt, sort the ignition timing, go from there.

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Richard309Sri XU5JA 205GTi
On 8/27/2021 at 12:25 AM, ob2s said:

. Can adjustments also be made to the MAF ?

Yes as above, welshpug, the "bypass" screw can be used to increase or decrease the amount of "metered" air going through the MAF(AFM) - LE2 jetronic. - it's done using an allen key shape on the bottom left of the MAF as viewed from top as fitted in vehicle. 

 

ref above: a previous posting/special article about it

 

quote from that"To allow fine tuning of the exhaust gas CO (and other emission) percentage, there is a similar screw on the AFM. This allows some air to enter the engine without being measured, so by turning this screw, you can set the air/fuel ratio." 

 

I was looking at it today on mine:- so screw it out(anticlockwise) lets more air past the vane - aka the flap inside. so the ECU injects less fuel as it thinks less air is being burnt. [[Im guessing the ECU is programmed for just less than 14.7 air to fuel ratio, - STOICHIOMETRIC but I am not sure if that would be with the screw right down or middle etc TBH]] - I believe adjusting that "CO" screw usually done in conjunction with an exhaust gas analyser so you get the correct CO reading/using the screw to set - well sometimes also adjusted as part of a complete idle re-set up as described in HAYNES. CO must be within the normal expected values obviously. 

 

[["Goinamanta" 's got a youtube vid. on adjusted the spring tension on the flap but I wouldn't touch that - again as per above post - unless you know it's been messed with/to get it back to normal only - everyone else will also say don't mess with that as above also I know and say youtube's crap/jokers etc probably LoL. {same style MAF used in Opel BMW Porsche Volvo SAAB etc etc etc}]]

 

worth asking the mechanic if he made it two teeth forward out or two teeth back out from standard..?

to have an idea what's going on..? or maybe is it obvious to the more experienced guys whether its been advanced or retarded..? ref your distributor pic. also

 

In theory either way then there must be a compensation somewhere else or obviously something else is  faulty - so it's worth checking the emissions anyway? that might give a clue what's going on? 

 

I'm right in understanding the ignition timing is also termed the static timing I think. that's defo got to be set to the Haynes pin position with the cam belt marks lining up to start off with as previous comments and posts. Says the same in the French manuals I have got also to set it up. 

 

talking of metered air - it could be worth checking for manifold vacuum leaks as obviously they would affect the air fuel mixture....(?) 

 

Hope that this posting helps & that I'm not putting anything wrong up,(sorry it's a bit long) - just wanted to add as much info as might be useful.  

 

 

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ob2s

Hi all, still struggling with this. Only runs well after a run on the motorway. I paid 65 euro to get my datacard from l'adventure Peugeot and found I have the original motor (yay, but doesn't help) , but I am still trying to figure out which timing belt tensioner I have as it dictates the number of teeth on the belt. I have removed the top cover, but I still can't tell if I have the eccentric or non-eccentric tensioner. You barely see it from above like in the photo. How much else do I have to remove to be able to see this damn thing ?

Thanks

 

 

IMG_2706.jpg

Edited by ob2s

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welshpug

metal top cover means it should have the pre 15/01/1992 sprung sliding tensioner, post 15/01/1992 has a plastic top cover and eccentric tensioner.

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welshpug

if this has been changed why are you asking?

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ob2s
9 minutes ago, welshpug said:

if this has been changed why are you asking?

Thanks, WP. They guy I took it to to change the water pump and timing belt said he had a hard time getting it to run right. The timing belt kit (German) came with the belt, the pump and the tensioner. He didn't replace the tensioner. He couldn't say why he didn't (it is what I have to deal with because no one here will touch Peugeot). So I took it to another shop (old Volvo's) and asked them to do the shimmed drill bit line up of the cam timing and they found it to be off. I called the original guy and he said it wouldn't run right in that 'correct' alignment, Currently it idles perfectly, but stutters on acceleration. Subsequent to a 'hot' run on the motorway, it seem to run fine and accelerate fine.  Without expertise to reconcile what is happening, I am basically screwed. So I thought I would start from the basics. Since my datacard says 5/1989 as manufacture date and the fact the timing belt cover is metal, then I must have the slider tensioner and therefore the correct timing belt. Since the mechanic that will touch the car said it wouldn't run correctly in the 'aligned' mode, if I ask the Volvo shop to align it, I am not sure I will be doing anything but pissing money away. At this point, I guess I can live with only driving it subsequent to a hot run on the motorway, but it would be nice to use to pop out for dinner or something, but I need to get over that I guess and consider it runs well at all without my limited abilities to diagnose. 

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Tom Fenton

I imagine he put changing the tensioner into the "too difficult" bracket. Its not actually that hard but is a bit fiddly I suppose especially if you aren't familiar.

 

The reason it won't run if you correct the cam timing, is because the distributor is driven off the other end of the cam, so moving the cam timing to be correct moves the ignition timing to be wrong, and clearly wrong enough it won't run. The original guy clearly is pretty clueless if he could not figure that out.

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