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Gavin Waddell

Junior timer connectors

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Gavin Waddell

I’m going to repin my wiringloom plugs and while looking for new terminals I have found some JT connectors in the RS catalogue for the smaller gauge wires. Now for the bigger guage  wires I can’t seem to find any JT connectors ( actually I can buy they are quite expensive) only JPT. Now I know that the JT have 1 locking tab and the JPT have 2. Has any one ever used a JPT in a JT plug and just loped off one of the locking tabs ? Or am I just trying  bodge something that won’t work properly.

 

thanks Gavin 

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Telf
Posted (edited)

either will fit. check out www.polevolt.co.uk for all that kind of stuff

 

Edited by Telf

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Gavin Waddell

Ok Then, thought junior timer and junior power could only fit in their respective housings due to the locking tabs being single or double. Pens up a whole lot more options then. Pole volt is quite expensive then there is shipping found a few places over here that stock them

 

thanks for the info

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Telf

gavin all i know is i used both types and they seem to fit ok

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Gavin Waddell

ok cool, heres another question. what AWG size contacts did you go for? i was going to get some 15-20awg for small wires and then some 13-17AWG for the bigger wires.

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welshpug

that depends on the gauge of the wire you put in them, that's what the AWG means, the contact itself is the same size, bar the wire crimp part.

 

 

20-14 awg is 0.50 mm2 to 2.5mm2,    17-12 is 1 to 4mm2

 

https://www.rapidtables.com/calc/wire/awg-to-mm.html

 

20 awg is about 0.8mm diameter, 14 is about 1.6mm diameter.

 

 

RSonline is good for terminals but might take a while to find the right pin sometimes!

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Gavin Waddell

Yeah i get what AWG stands for,  but thanks for the table also welshpug

 

I went to look at a few spare plugs i had and i reckon that with some 20AWG -15AWg or .8mm diameter to 1.5mm diameter will be good for most of the plugs on the ignition loom.

And some 17AWG-12AWG for some of the bigger wires. I cant get anything bigger that 12awg on the website i am looking at, unfortunately RS dont sell to the private sector over here. So looking at Digikey instead they have a wide range of options ven hold ones!

 

Heres another question the JPT have the little rubber boot that goes on the wire to help seal the connector are these compatible with a JT connector? Dont want to order something that i wont use in the end.

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Telf

Gavin. The link I mentioned (polevolt) shows you the various consumables for each type of connector. I think the seals are common to both but check because I haven't looked recently.

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Thijs_Rallye
Posted (edited)
On 4/8/2020 at 9:19 PM, Gavin Waddell said:

Now I know that the JT have 1 locking tab and the JPT have 2. Has any one ever used a JPT in a JT plug and just loped off one of the locking tabs ?

It'll work just fine and indeed break of the unused tab or you will have a rough time getting them out ever again. The newer JPT terminals also have a better contact surface on them pins themselves. (they don't have the slot in the middle)

 

The pins with the boot will fit the JT but will not provide a strain relief without using a boot. https://www.automotive-connectors.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=jpt

They can be had without seal option as well.

Edited by Thijs_Rallye

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Gavin Waddell

Thanks for that, will order JPT then more options to choose from. 

 

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Gavin Waddell

Here’s another question, what our your thoughts on joining wires?

1:heat shrink Crimp straight connector

2: solder connector (like a straight connector but with à solder joint in the middle)

3: solder joint then heat shrink

 

ive always soldered my connections, but have been reading a bit.and also YouTube and the consensus is more to heat shrink crimp connectors. 

 

Intrested in people thoughts and first hand Experiance.

 

Gavin

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jackherer

Number 2 if you mean solder sleeves.

 

They are what Peugeot dealers use. I even have some in a Peugeot bag with a PSA part number.

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Telf

i used solder sleeves supplied by Kieran (peugeot ones) to build my engine loom. I do the odd repair with a solid raychem splice and a heat shrink environmental seal over the top as well. Dont use tape/chocolate blocks nor those awful crimp blocks you can get that bite through the insulation. All garbage in my opinion.

 

solder sleeves are probably easiest in most cases, especially if access is ok, you only need a cable stripper, the sleeve and a heat gun device.

 

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Gavin Waddell

Jackherer that’s exactly what I meant “solder sleeves”.

 

Ok, that was the direction that I was going to go, no more soldering wires. What do you reackon of putting heat shrink over the top of the sleeve as extra protection?

 

dont worry telf, I won’t be twisting wires

thenntaping them, or chock blocks or those horrible things that cut into the wire, none of that here thank you.

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jackherer
26 minutes ago, Gavin Waddell said:

What do you reackon of putting heat shrink over the top of the sleeve as extra protection?

There's no need to but if you prefer how that looks there is no reason why not.

 

12 hours ago, Telf said:

you only need a cable stripper, the sleeve and a heat gun device.

You can even activate them with a cigarette lighter in an emergency so they're ideal for field repairs too.

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DamirGTI
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, jackherer said:

You can even activate them with a cigarette lighter in an emergency so they're ideal for field repairs too.

Does this means that one must become an emergency smoker too or find one in "state emergence" ! :P

 

Anyhow , on the subject and expanding a bit off the 205 here , there's one particular component on more modern/newer cars where you better off not using solder and heat shrink tubing and that's an O2 sensor .. precisely new style O2 sensors without "vent holes" on the actual sensor body , in universal form (without OEM specific connector) these are supplied with special in line crimping connector .

 

Still not 100% if the above is actually true , but having failed twice on newer cars by doing the solder method on new O2 sensor i stopped doing that and instead using crimp on gear supplied with the sensor .

 

All the rest of the stuff i solder and heat shrink tube , insulation tape of course on the end .. sometimes also liquid type (brush on liquid el. tape) .

Never liked crimp jobs on wiring , tends to be much to go wrong with such repair .

 

D

Edited by DamirGTI
  • Haha 1

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Gavin Waddell

I ordered up some jpt terminals so that I can change the ones that are a bit worse for wear in my loom, but now  I’m realising I need a crimping tool, what do people on here use?

 

some that I’ve looked at out quite expensive, I know I need the fight tool for the job.  

I was looking at this:https://www.molex.com/molex/products/part-detail/application_toolin/0638111000 any good?

 

thanks

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