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Telf

Next week I'm taking my 205 to emerald to be mapped.

The engine is a fresh build as detailed in my engine build thread. New rings, bores, shells but run in crank and cam shaft.

 

I'm torn as to how to proceed . Do I try and run the car around the area outside the workshop prior to mapping, get it up to temp to make sure no hoses etc spring a  leak or run it to temp stationary?

 

Also what oil is recommended during this phase? Should I get it to temp then do a flush and filter change or what?

 

Advice and thoughts please- thanks

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opticaltrigger

Hey Telf, excellent news mate.

I would just run it up stationary and use the cheapest nastiest oil you can get your hands on to, then dump it and the filter and change for clean.

 

All the best,

O.T.

 

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Thijs_Rallye
11 hours ago, opticaltrigger said:

I would just run it up stationary.

 

Never let a fresh engine idle for a prolonged time. There is only a small time window in which you can bed the rings. Try loading up the engine ASAP, or break it in on the rollers.

 

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

 

The site looks horrendous, but it is accurate in it's information.

 

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opticaltrigger
On 4/9/2019 at 7:05 AM, Thijs_Rallye said:

Never let a fresh engine idle for a prolonged time. There is only a small time window in which you can bed the rings. Try loading up the engine ASAP, or break it in on the rollers.

 

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

 

The site looks horrendous, but it is accurate in it's information.

 

Hi Thijs,

Yes, I agree that some load should be applied as soon as possible.., But,

He was talking about just running it up to temperature prior to mapping (which would be under load on rollers) in order to check for leaks etc. Not setting the idle up...

 

All the best

O.T.

 

 

 

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Thijs_Rallye
On 4/14/2019 at 11:06 PM, opticaltrigger said:

He was talking about just running it up to temperature prior to mapping (which would be under load on rollers) in order to check for leaks etc. Not setting the idle up...

 

I hope I didn't come across offensive because that certainly wasn't my intention :).

 

Anyways, you have a (approximate) 20/30 minute window in which you can make or break the seal between the rings and cilinder. I understand you shouldn't be fully loading up a cold engine, but letting it idle (even for the sake of warming it up) is in the time you have your precious break in window. 

 

Cheers


Thijs

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opticaltrigger

Not at all Thijs,

This is a technical forum and this kind of discussion is exactly what we should have. Engineering always achieves it's best when discussed and no offence is taken at all, forgive me if my reply gave such an impression.

 

All the very best

O.T.

 

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Tom Rallye

I can add a bit of personal experiance to this subject, not with the 205, but that isn't important in this case.

Last year I bought a Hyundai I30N. The run in procedure described by Hyundai was to run it in easily for 1000 km, avoiding high rpm (above 3000).

When I got mine delivered I immediatly took it to a dual carriageway 1km from the dealer, it had 5 km on the clock. I than did nothing but pulls with WOT in 4th gear from 1500 to 5000 rpm ( this creates overboost from the turbo), breaked on the engine and than again the same procedure, this for 50 km (about 45 minutes). After that I just drove the car normally, didn't care about run in anymore.

A while later I met a few other guys with a I 30N who all followed the run in as described by Hyundai. They all had to admid that my car pulled stronger, ran smoother and was more economical than theirs. May have been a coinsidence, but I don't thnk so...

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Telf

So I've decided to fill it with 10W40 and just crack on for a few weeks . I may change it again then. The oil that came out today post the rolling road was pretty trashed. The sump plug with its magnetic tip had a coating of fine metallic debris but not a lot. 

 

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SweetBadger
On 4/19/2019 at 6:02 AM, Thijs_Rallye said:

 

I hope I didn't come across offensive because that certainly wasn't my intention :).

 

Anyways, you have a (approximate) 20/30 minute window in which you can make or break the seal between the rings and cilinder. I understand you shouldn't be fully loading up a cold engine, but letting it idle (even for the sake of warming it up) is in the time you have your precious break in window. 

 

Cheers


Thijs

 

I have always run in new rings as per the instructions on that site using either running in oil or a good mineral oil, and can’t see why you’d need to baby an engine that has been built well.

 

But what do you do when you have a new camshaft and piston rings to think about? A new camshaft needs to be run for 20 mins at 2500rpm, not allowed to idle, and not revved. This goes against the advice on running new rings in. 

 

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Thijs_Rallye
Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, SweetBadger said:

 

I have always run in new rings as per the instructions on that site using either running in oil or a good mineral oil, and can’t see why you’d need to baby an engine that has been built well. 

 

But what do you do when you have a new camshaft and piston rings to think about? A new camshaft needs to be run for 20 mins at 2500rpm, not allowed to idle, and not revved. This goes against the advice on running new rings in.  

 

 

Yes, that thought has occurred to me often as well. If it was my own engine, I'd run it in on the street late at night so I wouldn't have to drop the revs below 2,5 krpm. Luckily my budget always usually me to second hand parts :').

Edited by Thijs_Rallye
typo

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Tom Fenton
14 minutes ago, SweetBadger said:

 

I have always run in new rings as per the instructions on that site using either running in oil or a good mineral oil, and can’t see why you’d need to baby an engine that has been built well.

 

But what do you do when you have a new camshaft and piston rings to think about? A new camshaft needs to be run for 20 mins at 2500rpm, not allowed to idle, and not revved. This goes against the advice on running new rings in. 

 

Knock the cam in then just drive it to bed the rings. Done it many times no I’ll effects.

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petert

I do 10 mins for cam @ 2000, then bed the rings in with some 4th gear pulls as described by Tom above, either on the road or on the dyno. This process forces the rings out against the bore. Using straight mineral oil first is essential. 

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Telf

well in terms of running in the engine it was a run in crank and cam so I only had to worry about the bores and rings.

 

What actually happened in the end was - I carried out a few starts on the car. Ran in up and down the farm track at varying revs but it was massively over fueling as the MAP supplied wasn't really correct.

I then went on the rolling road at Emerald to get the Map sorted and the technician ran the engine in there, set the Map and then did the power runs.

The oil used initially was... well actually I've no idea ! I took it from a 500L barrel in the garage where I've been building the car. I do know it was exceptionally thin as we had to stop the rolling road for a bit to allow the engine to cool ( the pressure light had come on at idle).

 

I've since drained the oil as described.

 

I guess that it has worked out ok as the car made good power for a standard engine at 129.3Bhp (flywheel) and 101 at the wheels.

 

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