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Danez

Is this boot floor salvageable?

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Danez
Posted (edited)

Might not be enough detail to say for sure but I'm wondering what you think.

Obviously there's more rust to take back but it feels fairly solid where the rust in the corners are (Passed the screwdriver jab test)
As you can probably guess a lot of it moves if i press down on it where it's bad.

I personally think it can be saved it's not that bad...best methods for restoring it? just cut out and weld bits in?!
Anyway here are some pictures

 

cheers

 

rust2.jpg

rust1.jpg

rust3.jpg

Edited by Danez

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DamirGTI

If you can weld , no problem at all . Cut the rusted areas off and weld in patch panels , other surface rust areas clean up and treat with rust converter .

 

 

D

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Andy

Agreed. The hard bit is making up new sections because of the ridges in the boot floor . The floor joins the rear cill via a return flange that points downwards . Remove all the rusty metal , in sections , carefully. Occasionally, boot floor sections come up on eBay. Might be worth looking for a good one that you could use to provide patches for yours .

Andy

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MrAndy

It looks like it can be saved OK. They always get bad from the corners.

 

I have the same situation in one of my cars and I also have a good spare floor which I will use.

 

Anyway I have been thinking how have you usually solved the point where the bar goes from left to right under the car? Meaning, remove the floor and the bar together from the car or leave one or the other to car and replace the other one separately...

 

-A-

 

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Danez
13 hours ago, DamirGTI said:

If you can weld , no problem at all . Cut the rusted areas off and weld in patch panels , other surface rust areas clean up and treat with rust converter .

 

 

D

thought so, good to know thought cheers.

Ive never touched a welder in my life but fancy picking up a mig welder and having a go, don’t fancy paying a garage to do it...

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Tom Fenton
24 minutes ago, Danez said:

thought so, good to know thought cheers.

Ive never touched a welder in my life but fancy picking up a mig welder and having a go, don’t fancy paying a garage to do it...

Please take this comment in the spirit it is intended, that is not the place to learn how to weld. By the time you have bought a decent machine, a decent mask, angle grinder and discs, sealant, paint, etc, you will be well into £500. All to do unless you are an as yet undiscovered welding genius probably a pretty duff job of it. Certainly I can hold my hands up and admit the first welding on a car that I did was utter s*ite.

I encourage anyone to have a go, but learning to weld is best done on thick clean material at first. Something you cannot blow a hole in if you try. Gets you used to handling the torch, seeing what is going on, learning to adjust the power and wire feed. Then move onto thinner stuff, settings become more critical but practise makes perfect. Finally the holy grail thin and rotten car bodywork. But I would not start there.

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Danez
21 minutes ago, Tom Fenton said:

Please take this comment in the spirit it is intended, that is not the place to learn how to weld. By the time you have bought a decent machine, a decent mask, angle grinder and discs, sealant, paint, etc, you will be well into £500. All to do unless you are an as yet undiscovered welding genius probably a pretty duff job of it. Certainly I can hold my hands up and admit the first welding on a car that I did was utter s*ite.

I encourage anyone to have a go, but learning to weld is best done on thick clean material at first. Something you cannot blow a hole in if you try. Gets you used to handling the torch, seeing what is going on, learning to adjust the power and wire feed. Then move onto thinner stuff, settings become more critical but practise makes perfect. Finally the holy grail thin and rotten car bodywork. But I would not start there.

ah ok cheers for the heads up 

i was planning on getting some metal just for practise before starting on the car.

I’ve not yet decided though...might get a quote from a body shop. i have another 205 with a good boot floor so i could provide the metal.

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MrAndy

And the old thruth is that bad welders become good grinders and sanders :)

 

-A-

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Andy

Top tip. Take Tom’s advice .

Andy

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farmer

Tom is right

 

My car needs some small welding work ( hole in the floor and new rear bumper brackets )  Welding some older farm machinery with a stick welder is one thing but the car is another so off to garage it went 

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