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Grenouille

[Car_Overhaul] 205 1.6 Gti Overhaul And Rebuild

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Mac Crash

I'd second that with the welder, it's surprising what can be achieved if your careful and depending how bad they are...

 

I'll look out for some back plates for you anyway... don't suppose you know in what order the rear oil seal goes back together do you?

 

Untitled_zpsnqbecoet.jpg

Rebuilt the back brakes (Girling drums) yesterday but was so long ago I dismantled them that can't remember exactly how the oil seal goes back together.

 

Seems to be in 3 parts, the bronze coloured ring, the rubber oil seal and a flat fibre/plastic, possibly metal washer type disc.

 

There is a thin groove on the fat part/shoulder of the stub axle, does the rubber oil seal locate on here? and are the other parts pressed into the drum against the bearing? That's the way I have put them together anyway... haven't fully torqued both drums up yet but there is play on both sides, I have 2 sets of washers that sit behind the hub nuts, large and small, can't remember which one is 1.6 or 1.9... definitely 1.6 stub axles though, I checked...

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culreoch

Hi Tom, I'd been advised to get them blasted but "I'll chip the worst off, then get the knotted brush on them"... 5min later.... I've put holes in both.

At that point, I thought, stop before I make it worse!

 

Will have a look in the cold light of day.

 

 

Colin we did the rear bearings ourselves last year. I can't for the life of me remember adding parts 1 and 2 to the drum, must have been left on the stub axle.

 

Here's the best record pic I have, see if you can make anything out in the gloom?

 

The drums themselves are up at Andy's so it'll be the weekend before I can refresh my memory. I just brought the guts of them down the road.

 

29581082266_10bae70637_o.jpgdrum internals

Damn iPhone has decided to start taking pics at 840x480 resolution. Maybe time to delete a few.

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Mac Crash

If that is the thin lip of the rubber seal I can see in the centre of the back plate then I know what I have done wrong and it makes sense now... I had the back plates off the axle and that is where the seals have originated from... I think.

 

Think the service box photo isn't relevant either as the later drum has a 2 piece bearing... your photo is more helpful, cheers...

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culreoch

So, the boot floor is repaired, painted and we got the shiny refurbed beam on (thanks Tom - it's the best thing on the car now).

As advised above, the drum backplates were cleaned up by Andy and roughly inch-square plates were welded in to repair the rotten bits.

 

Building the drum brakes up was a bit of a nightmare - think it took us two full days, partly by having stuff on the wrong side, and partly because the wheel bearings were a very tight fit on the stub axle. Nevertheless, we got all that resolved and it's back on 4 wheels.

 

New copper-alloy brake lines were made up (though as you can maybe see below, I made a balls of the route and will probably re-do them) and the tank refitted. It had been a struggle to remove the filler neck and pipe work, so of course "refitting is the reverse of removal" and another bit of a fight. The tank was on and back off many times. Afraid I lost my sense of humour with it at one point!!

 

Meanwhile as a bit of light relief couple of holes in the NSR arch and inner arch got welded up - more things ticked off the list.

 

So the back end's just about done :)

 

29854926410_2594e9c87b_c.jpg

 

NSR (before)

 

then...

 

29854927850_54e9aa8fa9_c.jpg

NSR (after)

 

A couple of loose ends to tidy up there and then we need to switch to the front end, plan is to take the engine out over the winter for some degree of rebuild. That puts the fear into me, but then again, what could possibly go wrong??

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Anthony

Looks miles better under there now, but how come you've routed the rear brake flexi hose how you have?

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culreoch

Looks miles better under there now, but how come you've routed the rear brake flexi hose how you have?

Purely through error Anthony,

 

I misremembered the arrangement when replacing the hard lines - they do need re-routing as the flexis are at risk of damage as they currently sit.

 

Easily fixed :)

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buchanan84

Good work ????

Mine had reached the stage where all that stuff has been removed from the rear end... need to get wire brushing...

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culreoch

Turning now to the front of the car, we have to look at an engine billowing smoke, tired suspension and more of our favourite stuff: rust.

 

The Christmas break gave us time to rig up a borrowed gantry to lift out the engine, and take the front apart. To give us a remote chance of putting it all together correctly again a fair few photos were taken to record the layout and routing of all the engine bay gubbins.

 

Disconnect some wires and pipes, couple of bolts and up and out comes the engine:

32067664742_7fbc789f6d_c.jpgP1050831

 

Yep. Crusty. More pics to record, then that subframe, suspension and various ancillaries came out.

32067667712_4461b38bf2_c.jpgP1050836

 

The chassis rail was scaly, but cleaned up nicely. Holes in the inner wing, low down at the bulkhead were found on both sides and now awaits welding.

 

That brake compensator is another part of this car that looks like it's been deep in the mid-Atlantic for years. The internals seem sound though. Each end was labelled as otherwise there's a 99% chance I'd put it back the wrong way around! Even now I might get it wrong...

32067671472_936be1f352_c.jpgIMG_1989

 

Both the engine and lighting etc looms are in pretty poor state - both corrosion and past bodgery. I got to this stage in trying to remove the lighting loom and called it a day. Looks like much of the dash needs taken apart to get at it :(

32067673082_030a9dc033_c.jpgIMG_1996

 

Tangled mess... and there's a bit of bodgery in there too - maybe the remnants of an alarm install. At about the same time as I was getting tired by this metallic spaghetti, Andy got slightly bitten by the wire brush and angle grinder when cleaning up some of the front suspension parts - again a sign that it's time to call a halt.

 

Next up, I think we'll be welding the inner wings and then building up the front suspension.

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culreoch

Time for a catchup of where we are.

 

Firstly, a milestone: no more welding! None too pretty with the silver jotamastic paint, but a subsequent squirt of aerosol body colour over the top (where visible) improved things.

33466020602_1d7927f6d4_c.jpg

shell

 

The last major component still in situ - the dashboard - was disassembled to release the engine and ancillary looms. Both were very much worse for wear and have come home with me to refurbish and repair them. Taking the dash out was a hateful exercise in finding the invisible fasteners and sh*te falling our faces and eyes.

33493386391_8ff1cd7565_c.jpg

dash

 

More excitingly though, it was finally time to bite the bullet and pull the engine apart. Scary stuff from my point of view, I'm well into the unknown here.

 

Despite the general condition of the car, there were encouraging signs of the engine having been looked after. Belt, tensioner and waterpump were in good nick and quality items. Shame about the spark plug substituting for a sump oil temperature gauge though!

 

Inside, nothing really worrying us too much so far:

33466030952_5df263296b_c.jpg

head

33466025442_7b5773410c_c.jpg

head off

33466025532_1402a970ee_c.jpgworn liner

 

There was a bit of a wear lip that could be felt on the liners, but no immediately apparent corrosion problems. But I don't want to speak too soon.

 

After a bit of measuring and cleaning in its present state, we'll disassemble a bit further then order up the appropriate parts to start nailing it back together.

 

Feels like we're getting somewhere :)

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Leslie green

The scottish weather has been very sore on that car , great work you have done saving it .

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culreoch

Cheers Leslie... it had a pretty comprehensive history file with it - which shows it spent a lot of time in (rainy) Wales before coming northwards via the (rainy) West of Scotland, so it's had a hard life in that respect.

 

Hopefully it will have a more sheltered time in future.

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culreoch

Managed to find a couple of days to continue work on the engine of the old Pug this weekend, stripped down the bottom end to find nothing particularly worrying.

 

Cylinder liner wear kinda meant we had to play the Russian roulette of removing the liners for replacement, with the risk of finding liner seat corrosion; but happily all seems well in that regard. The crank was measured up and seems to be in-spec - so far so good. So we can go ahead and order the parts to put it all back together.

 

Up top, all's not quite as rosy at the cylinder head. The valves measure up as undersize, possibly through wear. More significantly there's some alloy corrosion worryingly close to the gasket at the top of cylinder liners 1 and 4, and we don't yet know about valve guide wear. Think in all likelihood the head will be going to an engine shop for a once-over.

 

We also have a spare head, but it's swings and roundabouts. It appears to be a different variant, possibly XU5J vs XU5JA, and while the head casting looks to be spot on, there's a few flaws on the cam. Our current thinking is to try and retain the original head if possible.

 

It's all good fun, even if progress is pretty glacial at the moment!

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cybernck

Very good progress! Any new updates as yet?

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culreoch

Hi Nikica, sadly not much of late while other things have got in the way. We did spend a day finishing off replacing all the brake lines (including fixing my first attempt at routing the pipes around the beam) but that's really it since July :o.

 

So the car will now stop... just need to get it going again next :)

 

I think the next thing will be for me to get cracking with the wiring looms over the Xmas break, one job that doesn't involve cold rusty metal and lying on a cold concrete floor!

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GusRallye

Looks like you had your work cut out for you there, good progress!

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Grenouille

An update! Engine rebuild is slowly getting there.

 

took the head and crank to AGRA Engineering in Dundee for skim/rebuild and dimensional check/polish respectively. Great service there.

 

Meanwhile we purchased a rebuild set from Pug1Off and I’ve set about the bottom end and block. So far I’ve got the pistons in and got the crank just about in. Next I need to check the end float to ensure the thrust washers are suitable. However I believe I’ll have to disconnect the big end bearings in order to accurately measure the float. Correct me if I’m wrong...

 

Any tips or advice welcome. 

 

 

48B7BBD7-A1D2-48FC-8B4A-E2C1D3EA16BF.jpeg

A884D6D9-C9E3-4A10-BF6B-CD140FA45F39.jpeg

A371B3A8-A89C-433C-883C-4866702FF637.jpeg

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