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my3AWDgst

Rear Axle Camber And Toe Adjustment On 405

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my3AWDgst

I've been searching for some time now and I haven't found anything or any kit that would make camber and toe adjustment possible on rear axle. Would anyone here remember or know if camber or toe adjustment kit is available? I was thinking to import 306 GTI rear axle but I'm not sure if this swap is possible. We literally have zero information on this here in US as most of Peugeot owners are seniors and the brand it self is forgotten:-(

 

Thanks in advance guise.

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allanallen

There simply isn't anything available (or at least anything that you'd want to use) for a 405. A 306 beam won't help you as they're not adjustable either I'm afraid, nor will it fit without extensive mods

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my3AWDgst
Posted (edited)

I was afraid that may be the case!

Thank you sir.

Edited by my3AWDgst

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JeffR
Posted (edited)

Allan, I've looked into this too and came up empty handed. Could you heat, bend & twist the trailing arms? A bit Heath Robinson admittedly.

Edited by JeffR

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petert

Can't you bore out the hole on an angle and fit an oversize stub axle?

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JeffR

Can't you bore out the hole on an angle and fit an oversize stub axle?

You'd also need to make the equivalent adjustment to the caliper mounting points as well, wouldn't you?

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allanallen

I'm sure I could machine these for different geometry, I've done 106 and 206 arms (as well as 205/309/306) now which are similar in design. I didn't mention it as the OP was after adjustable arms.

 

Yes Jeff, the caliper bracket face would also need machining to suit the new geo.

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my3AWDgst
Posted (edited)

I've heard that US 405's calipers are mounted different then the ones on Euro 405. Or was it brake hose location was in different position? Anyone?

Edited by my3AWDgst

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my3AWDgst

This is US 405 rear brake caliper mounting location.

post-26033-0-74204800-1495779476_thumb.jpg

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calvinhorse

That looks the same to me

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petert

Yes, looks the same to me as well. Mi16x4 are different.

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my3AWDgst

Yes, looks the same to me as well. Mi16x4 are different.

That must be it then. Thank you

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B1ack_Mi16

Maybe the Partner / Berlingo has other angles on the arms as standard? Partner / Berlingo arms are a 100% fit to 405 rear beam as it is literally the same suspension.

 

Could be worth looking into. But I think the heat and twist approach might be the easiest one, however not sure how it will affect the steel, but it has been done before over here I know.

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welshpug

its possible the vans do have different geometry but that goes out of the window as soon as you fit them on a 405 as they sit at around 90mm higher!

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calvinhorse

I have a van rear beam on my 405, it has less camber and tow than an mi16

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JeffR
Posted (edited)

Slightly off topic but my engineer has been looking into my request to increase my arb from 24mm to 30mm. He's been searching the possibility of using a hollow tube for it and welding on the splined ends to fit the trailing arms.

This is a system used by Porsche, speedway cars and dragsters.

I have reservations to its suitability to circuit racing. From what Iv'e read the bar diameter would need to increase considerably beyond 30mm to achieve the the equivalent resistance. The mounts need to be enlarged to take a 30mm bar but any further may compromise its structural integrity.

 

Thoughts????

Edited by JeffR

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Tom Fenton

A tubular roll bar will be much stiffer in torsion than its solid counterpart at the same size.

 

However i'd say if you are serious you would be better having a proper roll bar made mounted on the boot floor (not inside the beam any more) with links to the trailing arms. You then can adjust the leverage using sliding clamps or even an adjustable blade.

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petert

The inside can well be hollow, as the centreline is the neutral axis and does nothing. As you move away from the neutral axis, the resistance to torsion (or twisting motion) increases. The formula is called the Polar Moment of Inertia. To compare hollow and solid shafts, use the following formula:

 

solid

J=((pi)D^4)/32

 

hollow

J=((pi)(D^4-d^4))/32

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wicked

What would that do to you splined ends?

They will see the same torque as the thick middle part and twist a lot more.

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calvinhorse

Is there enough wheel clearance to put end plates on?

 

I like Toms idea or even a Whiteline style one

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petert

What would that do to you splined ends?

They will see the same torque as the thick middle part and twist a lot more.

 

True, but length is also a variable. ie 21mm torsion bars on a 405 are a lot softer than the same on a 205.

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my3AWDgst

Primarily these adjustment on my cars would be to extend life of the rear tires. I wold like to set it up for the best tire wear.

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