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Telf

Thanks Welshpug I thought so but wasn't 100% certain!

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Miles

1.8 block build I've done, dead easy

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jackherer

That's the answer then surely? There must be some 1.8 XU7s in scrapyards still?

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Telf

Jack,

 

I wouldn't know an Xu7 if I fell over it - also I'm really wanting to stay 100% original if possible

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jackherer

It's the 1.8 engine in 306s, 406s, Xsaras etc. It's the same casting as a 205 GTI 1.6/1.9 block with minimal machined differences AFAIK.

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welshpug

engine mounting bracket is different, as are alternator & pas brackets, the casting on the front of the block is a little different so it has to be thd xu7 item.

 

I do have both to hand and loads of pictures on my flickr and photobucket accounts.

 

holes need drilling and tapping to mount the stiffening plate, easy task, there's only one high pressure oil gallery tapped so a tee piece is needsd to run the pressure sender as well as a warning switch.

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Miles

They must differ as normal, the one I used had both oil pressure holes present

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Telf

So after the disappointment of yesterday I have spent a couple of hours cleaning the oily bits. having really no experience in this I'm wondering if this crank looks ok?

 

I presume the metal shells have to be replaced- some look a little worn to me. Also does the crank need to be measured at a machine shop in some way?

 

I'm torn between buying all new parts liners pistons and crank or reusing what I already have, having had a read of the forum it seems some folk replace everything and others reuse

 

Anyway heres the picture I took!

 

 


And the other half!

post-21474-0-09560300-1437563755_thumb.jpg

post-21474-0-45152300-1437563799_thumb.jpg

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Anthony

Crank looks pretty good at a glance, but get it checked by the machine shop anyway.

 

Replace the shells as a matter of course if they're showing signs of wear, and the machine shop will be able to confirm size when the crank is checked.

 

Wear/damage will determine whether the liners and pistons can be reused or whether they will need replacement. I imagine that if it's a typical ~25 year old engine with 100k+ miles and varying degrees of neglect over its life then the liners will need replacing.

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Telf

Thanks Anthony, having looked they are only £30 each so might as well replace- if I ever find a block!

 

I started cleaning the pistons- they seem ok although I noticed on each one that they definitely have a rub mark at the front face of each one - I think I read to just reverse them 180 degrees?

 

If I am going to replace the liners does it matter which piston goes back in which liner - at the moment everything is marked up showing its original position although I think I got the cylinder numbers the wrong way round- I numbered the one nearest the drive plate as 4 but maybe its 1..... :D

Edited by Telf

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hoodygoodwood

Pistons have to go in the right way round , the DIST arrow should point toward the cambelt end of the engine ( assuming this is a 1905cc lump )Will be fine to reuse the pistons as long as they are not damaged or excessively worn .I use white spirit and the rough green pad on a washing up sponge to clean the carbon off the pistons without damaging them . Break one of the old rings then use it to scrape the carbon out of the ring grooves .

The crank looks good but will need measuring with a micrometer to see if the journals are within the tolerances , if they are a quick polish and new std big ends and mains will be ok . If they are worn outside the tolerance the machine shop will need to regrind the crank and supply appropriate shells .On the couple of engines I have stripped recently the thrust washers had very little wear and were within tolerance so I will reuse them .

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Telf

ok ignorance again but what is the DIST arrow? ive just written front on all the pistons and numbered them for the time being - I will post a pic of them later

 

Thanks all I appreciated your help!

paul

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Anthony

Look on the top of the piston, possibly underneath the carbon if they're particularly black.

 

There should be a small arrow with "dist" next to it, which points towards the cambelt end of the engine as above,

 

Despite the similarity in name, it should NOT point towards the distributor!

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Telf

heres on on ebay for £25 I asked the seller to take some photos- corroded in same place as mine-not as bad but I'm supposing not worth the risk

 

 

 

post-21474-0-19269700-1437579705_thumb.jpg

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Clarky3rdNut

As someone with little experience and who is intending to carry out a rebuild, I want to say thank you for starting this topic. It is very useful to have all the questions and advice from the experts compiled into one thread.

Already a very informative read.

I wish you every success!

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Telf

Its going to get longer and its probably in the wrong section- will post some strip down pics when I get 5 minutes

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hoodygoodwood

Be very wary of buying that block , there is someone selling one on Ebay and all the main bearing caps are missing , you cannot just fit your ones as they are lined bored in the factory . you need a complete engine really , all the bits will come in useful

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welshpug

I wouldn't be confident in using that without inspecting it closer.

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welshpug

here's the font face of a 1.9 8v engine.

 

11903977553_deab40a49d_c.jpg

IMAG2069 by WELSHPUG, on Flickr

 

side view of XU7

 

3251336816_095e5a0c5e_z.jpg

PICT0283 by WELSHPUG, on Flickr

 

3251335240_50407065b3_b.jpg

 

 

 

rear face of an XU7 upper bracket.

19908690075_9e300e3362_z.jpg

20150722_085407 by WELSHPUG, on Flickr

 

19924831131_afffd6bef0_c.jpg

20150722_182415_LLS by WELSHPUG, on Flickr

 

I've never tried the 8v stuff on this block, other than this one does now have an XUD9TE crank in it and the XU9JA spacer plate fitted, and an XU10J4RS oil pump.

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Anthony

That's the XU7 16v block (obviously). AFAIK the XU7 8v block is much closer to the XU5/XU9 8v block.

 

The XU7 8v's were available upto around 1998 or so in 306's and Xsara's.

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Telf

Hoody thanks for that tip I didn't know that about the bearing caps- I might as well bin the ones I have then!

 

Welshpug - that's quite interesting - I might try something with an XU7 - but not until I complete this planned job - I'm determined to get a decent engine built - just wish I'd kept the blocks from my 2 write offs in '93!

 

I think Ive managed to source a couple locally- going to look at the weekend - fingers X'd!

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opticaltrigger

Hi Telf,

been reading through this a little again.

 

I find that a really good read through the Haynes manual can never hurt.Everything that you need is in that book.Somtimes it does need a very thourough read in places to find out the little details that count.It really is going to need to become your best friend through this.By the time that your engines rebuilt you should almost know every single page of the engine section by heart.

It will go well mate,just be slow and take your time with it.

 

One thing I like to do with a crank thats been reground and/or new shells used is to grip the crank upright in a vice and then get one of the rods, pop the new shells in and torque it up on the journal.Then just rotate it about the journal by hand to make sure that you dont feel any areas that feel tighter.Thats just me though.

 

By the way,I thought the gasket face on the top of that block looked like it had been dragged around somones workshop floor.Watch out for that bit to Telf when your sourcing a replacment block.

 

All the very best

O.T.

Edited by opticaltrigger

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Telf

Hi Optical!

 

I've read through the Haynes manual quite a bit now but as with most things in life the advice of those who have done it before is invaluable compared to reading the manual. The strip went well and I learnt loads but its the little things that always confuse -like removing the No.1 bearing cap- it just didn't make much sense even though I knew it MUST lift off!

 

I didn't realise the bearing caps are matched to the block either - after Hoody mentioned it I've trawled back through the manual but it doesn't mention it (well not that I've found). That would have really tripped me up as I might very well have bought a block without a bottom end.

 

As always thanks for the advice all, much appreciated.

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Telf

I've managed to get a new potential donor engine as far as the block goes- it has normal bolt heads rather than Torx bolts for the head bolts. I've never seen these before - are they supposed to be fitted or were they fitted on early models?

 

Are they more prone to snapping or anything like that when I try to get the head off?

 

Apart from the different head bolts this engine looks to be in reasonable order

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welshpug

itll be an early engine indeed, so the bolts will potentially have been in for nigh on 30 years..

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